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THE SECOND BOOK OF JOHN OWEN’S EPIGRAMS 

1. TO THE READER

Lest this my Book please fools, whereof are Many,
I would not have It many please, if any:
Few Readers are enough, but One (if wise).
If none do read me, none shall me suffice.

2. TO THAT INCOMPARABLE NOBLEWOMAN LADY MARY NEVILLE, HIS PATRONESS

The Praise of many’s rais’d by Poets Art,
But all thy Praise springs from thine own desert.

3. TO THE SAME

Thou to thy Foes, if any be, dost will,
Dost wish none ill, to Friends are Candid still:
This one thou never dost forget: That other
Thou never didst remember, Maid nor Mother.

4. TO THE SAME

In Tables men fair Faces paint and place,
There to survive, when Fates the Face deface:
I cannot paint, but I can Poetize,
And Verses can give Life, when Picture dies:
Though sole Apollo, sole Apelles able’s
Thee to describe in Verse, to paint in Tables.

5. TO SIR J. H., RIGHT TALENTED POET

I am no learned Poet, but a Learner:
No Learner Thou, but Poets learn’d Discerner.

6. WHAT NEWS? TO SIR JOHN HARINGTON, KNIGHT

The foolish People, as I pass the Street,
Inquisitive, thus ask (when me they meet):
“What News?” I tell them I know nothing New,
Or if I knew, I say no News I knew.

7. THE COURT

He that complies not in the Princes Hall
With All the witty, hath no wit at all.

8. OF AULUS

Wert Knighted, that thy wife should love thee more?
She loves thee less, her self more than before:
Her Garb, her Garments must new fashion’d be,
So that thy Dear will be more dear to thee.

9. OF THE CHYMIST

The Chymist Gold decocts, till (leaving none)
He loseth all his Gold to find a Stone.

10. A TROJAN

Troy lost, at last the Trojans wiser grew:
What man is not in this a Trojan true?

11. LOVES REMEDY

Take Wood from Fire (thy Lust with Fasting tame)
Sit from a Woman far, as from a Flame:
If not the former cool thee, nor the latter,
Then take a wife, she will b’ instead of water.

12. TROYNOVANT. TO THE LONDONERS

As Phoenix Ashes do the Phoenix breed,
So from old Troy new London did proceed.

13. THE LAWYERS DEITY

Rome had one God, call’d Terminus of old:
But Westminster more Terms than one doth hold.

14. OF THE EARTH

In all things we the Middle things commend,
For they to Mediocrity do tend:
Th’ Earth therefore than the Skyes hath greater grace,
Because i’ th’ world it holds the middle Place.

15. TO KING JAMES, DEFENDER OF THE FAITH

Thou greatest art of Christian Kings, in this
That to thy Faith the Faith committed is.

16. TO THE RIGHT ILLUSTRIOUS EARL OF DORST, THOMAS SACKVILLE, LORD TREASURER OF ENGLAND &c.

Th’ art Kings and Kingdoms faithful Treasurer:
Thy Faith before all Treasures I prefer.

17. TO THE RIGHT ILLUSTRIUS EARL OF SALISBURY, ROBERT CECIL, THE KINGS PRINCIPAL SECRETARY &c.

Thou secret keep’st the Kingdoms Secrets, even
So secret, that Faith to thy Faith is given.

18. TO THE VENETIANS

Your Cities Scituation (O wonder)
Is Founded unconfounded; th’ Ocean’s under:
Lest only Fish should in the water dwell,
Y’ have seated in the Sea your Citadel:
Where th’ Ocean was, a City’s now compleat,
What Nature made a Sea, Art made a Seat:
Y’ have constituted (to your grand Renown)
Th’ inconstant water constant to your Town.
What wonder then by Laws your City stands,
When it the lawless waters countermands.

19. TO THE LORD CHANCELLOR OF ENGLAND

Lest Force the greatest Enemy to Law,
Should violate it, Law keeps Force in awe:
But thou the Laws Extreams hast pow’r t’ abate,
And in the Chancery to moderate.

20. TO THE RIGHT ILLUSTRIOUS SIR HENRY HOWARD, EARL OF NORTHAMPTON &c.

Though thou from Noble Ancestors wert born,
And dost thy Birth with Noble Parts adorn:
Yet thou (which was a wonder heretofore,
And for a Prodigy now stands, or more)
Merit to Mercenaries, Peace to War,
Vertue to Strength, Worth dost to Birth prefer.

21. WILLIAM CECIL, LATELY TREASURER OF ENGLAND. 1596

Arms are, and Stratagems of small concern,
If Caecil’s Counsel sits not at the Stern:
Caecil and Atlas nobly both prognate, (Be born
This doth support the Skyes, and that the State.

22. OF WILLIAM CAECIL: VIRTUTE DUCE, COMITE FORTUNA

Great Queen Elisa Fortune made a count,
Why Vertue did She not t’ a Dukedom mount?

23. TO THE RIGHT REVEREND DOMINUS RICHARD VAUGHAN, BISHOP OF LONDON

O, of the British Thou th’ immortal Grace,
Art the First British Bishop of this Place.

24. TO THE SAME

I like those Preachers best, who Preach and Act;
Not those that only Preach but wave the Fact:
Thou therefore dost excell, for thou dost teach
What should be done, and dost what thou dost Preach.

25. TO THE RIGHT REVEREND DOMINUS THOMAS BILSON, BISHOP OF WINCHESTER

Bilson0, I was thy Scholar heretofore,
And to thy Precepts owe these Lines, and more.

26. THE LIFE OF WILLIAM WICKHAM, FORMERLY BISHOP OF WINCHESTER, WRITTEN IN LATINE BY THOMAS MARTIN, DR. IN THE CIVIL LAW

Life to the Dead to give, the Dead to raise
From Death to Life, ’s a Work deserving Praise:
Which hadst not done, thou, Martin, hadst been dead.
But now both in this one Book life, are read.

27. WINCHESTER COLLEDGE

Europes prime Schoool: whereof a little Part
I was to may great’st praise in Learnings Art:
Zoilus himself will not to thee deny
(Thy founder Wickam known) this Primacy.

28. TO SIR PHILIP SIDNEY

Great Alexander call’d Achilles blest,
Whom Homer prais’d in Verse above the rest:
Unhappy I, because thou half Divine,
Canst not made happy be by Verse of Mine.

29. TO SIR PHILIP SIDNEY

Whose Deeds worth writing, Lines worth reading are,
Is Rare: Thou therefore doing both art Rare.
Thy Lines worth reading, Deeds worth writing shew
Thee learned, candid, equaliz’d by Few.

30. UPON THE MARRIAGE OF WILLIAM EARL OF PEMBROKE, AND MARY, DAUGHTER OF THE EARL OF SHREWSBURY, 1605

In Manners, Personage, Wit, Age, Estates,
And in Nobility, you Both are Mates.
Yet thou deserv’st a better Bride than Shee:
A better Bridegroom She deserve than Thee.

31. TO ELIZABETH COUNTESS OF RUTLAND, SIR PHILIP SIDNEY’S DAUGHTER

’Twas Philip’s Praise thou wert his Child: But rather
Thine, that thou Daughter wert of such a Father.

32. TO LUCY COUNTESS OF BEDFORD

Lucy, thy splended name a Luce came, (From the light
That splendent though the World might be thy Name:
Thy Noble Parents brought thee forth to sight,
But thee thy Vertues brought into the Light.

33. A KNIGHTS RING. TO SIR HENRY GOODYEER, RIGHT WORTHY KNIGHT

Nobility the gold, the Gem be Grace:
This Ring upon thy Finger ever place.

34. TO SIR JOHN HARINGTON, RIGHT LEARNED KNIGHT

Thy Verse is Nameless, though not worthless, while
Others their worthless Verse with Names infile. (Fill up

35. TO D. B.

Thou livest well, if one well hid well lives:
And thy great wit conceal’d more splendour gives.

36. TO SIR THOMAS CHALONER, KNIGHT, THE PRINCES TUTOR

Thou so dost form, inform the Prince, that He
King of his Realms, and of Himself will be:
This Fifth to prize before those Kingdoms Four,
And of Himself, as well of them t’ have Power.

37. TO SIR ADAM NEWTON, THE PRINCES TUTOR

Thou so dost treach (for times of Sword and Gown)
The docile Prince, prime Hope of Britains Crown,
That scarce in future times ’twill be discern’d,
Whether He be more great, more good, more learn’d.

38. TO DOMINUS WALTER GWYN

Th’ Increase of the good Prince thou votest fair,
And sayst, Increase to sit in Arthur’s Chair;*
Nature gave Wit, may Grace attend his youth,
Grow may thine Honour with the Princes growth.

* Seeming a fatal Anagram of the Prince, as appeareth in the Book of Anagrams of Mr. Walter Gwyn, published in Scotland before Britain reborn.

39. FRANCIS DRAKE, 1581

Thy Travels, Drake, have reach’d Earths utmost bound,
Have seen both sides of the Terrestial Round:
If men be mute, the Stars will blaze thy Name;
And both the Poles will sound-resound thy Fame
Beyond the Gades: * Thou maist these words repeat,
“I greater am than Hercules the Great.”

* Hercules Pillars.

40. BRITAINS STRENGTH. TO THE PRINCE

The Ports* are Englands Gates; the Ships her Walls;
Camps Seas; Forts, Bodies Hearts the Generals.

* Havens.

41. THE TERRESTIAL GLOBE

Of Water and of Earth’s the Globe (Sea, Land)
That movable, this unremov’d doth stand.

42. HEALTH UNHEALTHY

The more thou drink’st of drunken Healths, the less
Of Health, of Happiness thou dost possess:
I wish a thousand of such Healths to thee,
And envy not: One Health’s enough for me.
One Health’s enough for sober men and sane:
No Health’s in Drinking Healths, no Boon, but Bane.

43. THE DIVINE

To know thine’s nothing, if not known ’tis known.

THE POLITICIAN

If known ’tis nothing then to know thine own.

44. ALL THINGS AFFECT GOOD

From Opto’ s’Optimus, without contest, (I hope
For that’s wise doth wish himself the best.

45. A PHOENIX ON EARTH

A certain Maid of Burgundy surpriz’d
With Maiden Sickness, helpless and advis’d
To take a little Ment, an Herb, a thing
Helpful to many (taken in the Spring)
She rather than to live by sin, would die:
Death being all the Purchase sin did buy.

46. DEMOCRITUS AND HERACLITUS

That only laugh’d, this only wept: but whether
Shall be laugh’d at, or wept for? Both, or Neither?

47. OF LANGA

Langa (she Papist) spous’d t’ a Lutheran,
T’ avoid contesting, thus to speak began:
“Lest future Discords should disturb our Peace,
To me be facile, and I thee will please;
Grant me the Liberty of Conscience,
And with all other things I will dispence.”

48. KING ARTHURS ROUND-TABLE

Why thy Round Table dost t’ a Square prefer?
Men made things Square, God made the circular.*

* The world.

49. TO ANNE

He must love much, and have no vulgar spirit,
Who doth thee praise, and love as thou dost merit.

50. OF HERNICUS

His Soul to God, his Body to the Ground
Hernick bequeath’d: And lying in a Swound (Swhoon
He hard some whisp’ring, that his wife had gain’d
A new-another Husband. Which disdain’d
By th’ envious Man, he gave his wife the Lye:
Reviv’d, whereas before he thought to die.

51. OF LOVE AND FAITH

Love is from Faith divorc’d: that ever is
Suspicious, not once suspected this.

52. A LOVER

Uncertain Hope, Fear constant, flying Pleasure,
Sad Joyes, sweet Grief, Love bitter. Where’s the Treasure?

53. THE GOLDEN AGE

Before the virtue was of Gold disclos’d,
Why was that Age the Golden Age suppos’d?

54. OF ALANA

In Bed Alana’s Place is lowest, yet
At Table in the high’st Place She’s set:
Her facile Husband parts with her the Sway,
He rules by Night, She governs all the day.

55. GERMANICK DEATH. TO POLYNICUS

Death’s not to be, saith Seneca. Some think,
(And Germans too) that Death is not to drink.

56. OF PHILODEMUS

Rare things, ’cause dear, thou shunnest, seekest common.
To thee more dear’s a vile than dearer Woman.

57. OF BATTUS

Thou secrets tell’st, crave’st pardon for the wrong:
Wouldst have no need of Pardon? Hold thy Tongue.

58. THE GORDIAN KNOT

The Gordian Knot cut once with Sword; Is it
Now rather to be loos’d by Sword, or Wit?
None can dissolve this Knot by Wit or Word:
Nor yet can Alexander with his Sword.

59. LOVE

Wars, Peace again: these things occur in Love.
Content, Contention in one Circle move.

60. STRIFE, LAW. TO DOMINUS WILLIAM JONES, A LAWYER AND HIS KINSMAN

Strife Laws produc’d, and Law produceth Strife:
None without One of these can live this Life.

61. THE MISER AND THE PRODIGAL

“My study’s Rhetorick” saith Prodigal:
“And mine” the Miser saith “is Logical.”
Logick close-fisted Avarice descries, (Decries
And Rhetorick mens Prodigalities.

62. LABOUR

Though th’ active Romans Grief no Labour deem’d,
Th’ inactive Greeks Labour a Grief esteem’d.

63. A GOOD, STRONG, WISE MAN

Good men want Wealth (but have divine supplies),
Wit to the Strong, Faith’s wanting to the wise.

64. THE ORDER OF THE GOLDEN FLEECE

Philip the Duke of Burgundy, ’tis feign’d,
That Order of the Golden Fleece ordained:
Whose Heirs the Golden Indies now possess.
This Order was an Oracle, no less.

65. THE MOTTO OF THE EARL OF DORSET, LORD TREASURER OF ENGLAND. NEC TEMERE, NEC TIMIDE (NOT HASTILY, NOT HEARTLESSLY)

Wisely suspect, and stoutly things expect;
Be circumspect, let thee no Fear deject.

66. THE MOTTO OF SIR HENRY NEVILLE HIS SON-IN-LAW. NE VILE VELIS (NOT VILE IS THY WILL)

Neville, thy will ne-vile, or vain brings brings forth: (Nothing vile
Sith vile things little, vain are Nothing worth. (Since

67. TO SIR PHILIP SIDNEY, OF HIS ARCADIA

Thou did’st command, when passing to thine Urne,
(Witness thy Wife) they should th’ Arcadia burn.
If it should die, for kindling Lovers Flames,
It ought not to be burn’d, but drown’d in Thames:
(In this thy Book no Line, no Letter’s found
That merits either to be burn’d or drown’d.)
What ever censure on thy Book may fall,
Thy Wit nor censure merits Death, nor Gall.

68. TO JANE OWEN, A MOST LEARNED WOMAN

None of thy Sisters have I heard or seen,
Though Five to th’ aged Father born have been.
How many then I know, but what they be
I know not: yet I know, if like to thee.

69. TO HIS FRIEND, DOMINUS JOHN THORIE

Ile be none’s Enemy, nor twice a Friend;
My Friendship where it doth begin shall end.

70. THE USURERS GRAMMER

Things Creeping, Swimming, Going, Fleeing, All
Love These, Those, all things, all Men inthral:
He, She, That, Coyn, Money, and Gold, these Three
Do conquer Love, by whom all conquer’d be.

71. TO ONE LIKE NEITHER PARENT

Why did thy Parents thee, not like unt’ Either
Beget, when they Consented Both together?
Thou no right form of Either Parent hast,
While both of them to form thee did what’s past.

72. TO TWO (NAMELESS) RETURNING FROM VENICE

That your Adventure fourfuld might return,
Your Journey you to Venice did adjourn;
From whence, when with your gain you came again,
Your Friends, though to their loss, rejoyc’d amain.

73. ADULTERY AND FORNICATION

What differs base Adulterers from vile
Fornicators? Tragick as from Comick stile.

74. OF HERCULES. TO C. D.

No force could force, or Hercules remove:
What was the greatest of his Labours? Love.
A Lioness, not Manners he could tame:
No Monstress, him a Mistress overcame.

75. A SALUTING KISS

Give me three Kisses, Phyllis: if not three,
So many as thy Lips are, give to Me:
Thou giv’st and takest one, deny’st one more,
Or take thou thine, or mine to me restore.

76. A PROBLEM TO NATURALISTS. OF KISSES

If Kisses to the Tast bring nothing sweet,
Why Kiss we with our mouth when Friends we meet?

77. OF LABIENUS

This Thief, the Gallows mounting, there to die,
“Thus, thus,” said he, “we scale the Starry Sky.”

78. OF ALEXANDER

One World, one Alexander not confin’d:
O than the world immenser was his mind.
To this one World, one Man was not compleat:
Great Alexander, but the World more great.

79. TO FIRMICUS. OF AULUS

Thou Firmick, credit’st none, all credit thee:
Aulus trusts all, but cannot trusted be.

80. OF A CERTAIN POETASTER

Thou pottest so as if no Pot, no Poet,
No Poetry; as if Pots only show it.|
Drunken carminifex, from out this word
Take mi, the rest to thee will well accord.*

* Carnifex, an Hangman.

81. OF A NAMELESS ONES LYING LETTERS

Thy false Epistle oft comes to my sight:
Or rare, nor never thou dost Gospel write.

82. PHYSICIAN, HEAL THY SELF. TO GILBERT

Vain is advice to thee, thy self to cure,
For ’tis thy greatest care, that cure t’ ensure.

83. OF A CERTAIN NAMELESS USURER

The thousand Pounds you dids’t to Flava lend,
Thou for it with full Usury doth send.
If like for like she gave, th’ art paid thereby:
Thou hadst her Bodies use for th’ Usury.

84. OF AN HYPOCRITE

All things he doth dissemble, or surmise:
Though Labour hence, thence Dolour doth arise.

85. OF ERASMUS HIS BOOK OF FOLLIES

Erasmus was the first who Folly prais’d:
This Folly shew’d his wit, his wisedom rais’d.

86. OF ANAGRAMMATICISTS

Whither, O whither will your wits inforce
Vowels and Letters here and there to course?
As when Augustus leisure gave, in one
Thyrsis his Sheep, his Goats brought Corydon.

87. OF A CERTAIN INDOCTRIN’D DOCTOR (Unlearned

Master in Art, thou Beardless-Artless wert:
Now Bearded Doctor th’ art, but more inert.

88. OF NAKED LOVE

Nature the Fields, the Birds, the Sheep, the Beasts,
With Grass, with Plume, with Fleece, with hair invests:
What ever under th’ Air is born or bred,
By Nature, or with Art is covered.
Why are all cloath’d but naked Love? Express,
The more Love naked is ’tis called the less.

89. OF THE EXCHEQUER. TO HIS FRIEND WILLIAM PITS

Into the Treasury collected Coyn
Runs, as fresh Rivers run into the Brine:
Out of the Treasury the Coyn dispers’d,
Runs as the Rivers from the Sea revers’d:
Not all those Rivers can the Sea supply,
Nor are the Fountains in the Mountains dry.

90. OF A PERFIDIOUS PERSON

I learn by trusting, not to trust Pretences:
My false and halpess Hope beguil’d my Senses.

91. THE SILVER SIN

No Whoremongers did Saturns Kingdom stain:
The World was chast till Jupiter did reign.

92. A BAWD

No part from Sale is of thy Body Free,
Nor is thy Soul, if one would buy’t of thee:
Thy Soul’s expos’d to Sale, but none would buy it,
For all, except the Devil, would deny it.

93. SELF-LOVE

I the First Person, Second Thou, Third He;
Yet Each t’himself seems First of all the Three.

94. WISDOM

Who’s Rich? the Wise. Whose Poor? the Fool: by which
If I be wise, I shall be quickly Rich.
Whose wise? the Rich: Who’s Fool? the Poor: then see,
If Rich I am not, I a fool must be.

95. THE ETYMOLOGY OF VENUS

Venus (sith one)* spontan’ous doth advene
Unt’ all things: doth not he unt’ all men mean?

* Cicero, de Nat. Deorum Lib. 2.

96. OF A CERTAIN DRUNKARD

If Potable, as Optable were Gold,
What Mines of Gold would thy vast Guts infold?

97. TO POLLA

A Kiss thou nor deny’st, nor givest one;
But turn’st thy Cheek, arid as is a Bone.
If new things must have new Names (not the same)
Kisses must have a New, another Name.

98. A FRIEND AND A WIFE

Life’s dear unt’ us, a Friend is therefore dear:
A Wife t’ her Husband’s dear. Why? ’cause so near.

99. ANGER

Because that Anger Valour doth precur,
Call’d Aristotle Anger Valours Spur?

100. THE ROMAN FLORA

Proud Rome, to which the world did Tribute pay,
Paid Tribute unto thee by night and day.
For All that was contributed to thee,
For Portage thou may’st call thy Tribute Free.

101. THE ETYMOLOGY OF THE ENGLISH WORD ANGER

Angry men Anguish have in Deed in Name;
Anger and Angor* then are near the same.

* Vexing.

102. OF HIMSELF

I grave in Trifles. Study playing: when
In grave things trifling, I play studying then.

103. WOMEN’S TITLES

A Count, when spous’d, his Wife a Countess makes:
A Countess makes no Count the Spouse she takes.
So from the Sun, the Moon receives her Light:
The Sun’s Light is his own, no borrow’d Right.

104. TO ZOILUS

The Praiser Praise, the Lover Love doth merit:
Praise then if Praise; Love, if thou’t Love inherit.

105. OF THE MIDDLE AGE. AN INDEFINITE DEFINITION

While drawing is our frail Life’s latest Line,
No Line the Middle Place can it assign.
That which th’ unlearn’d and learn’d call Middle Age,
None knows, till finish’d is his Pilgrimage.

106. TO A GREY-HAIR’D DIER

Thy Beard, once colour’d Black, ’s now colour’d White:
This Nature, not thine Art wrought, brought to Light.

107. TO AULUS

New Rome expell’d her King, proud she the proud:
What wonder? Pride Kings lov’d not, nor allow’d:
Tell why so few Kings Friends are found? ’cause there’s
Few that are Kings Competitors, or Peers.

108. THE BED. TO HIS FELLOW COUNTRYMAN DOMINUS MORRIS GRIFFIN

What the English Bed, the Welch call Sepulcher:
The Bed’s a Tomb, and Sleep doth Death infer.

109. RIDER’S LIBRARY

What means arrided Rider’s Book, thus stil’d (Mocked
A Library, sith but one Book’s compil’d, (Since
And that of words? It therefore should not carry
The Name of Library, but Dictionary.

110. MONY. TO HIS FRIEND JOHN TOVEY

Do Latine Criticks Nume* and Numisme name
That, which the Greeks Nome and Nomisme proclaim?
Or is ’t, O Nummus, ’cause thou numbred art,
Thy Name from Numb’ring comes, in whole or part?
Or is’ t because the world esteems Queen Coyn
To be some Goddess, Numen, or Divine?

* Mony.

111. OF J. S., A COVETOUS MAN

An Iron Chest thy Gold, Iron bars inviron (Surround
Thy Gate, House and House-holder all are Iron.

112. OF ROMAN FLORA, TO GRAMMARIANS

The Romans for the Flowers of their Fruit
Did Flora for a Goddess constitute.
She too too prodigal of Flesh and Fame,
Did neither bear good Fruit, or keep good Name:
But prostitute i’ th’ Flower of her youth
She lost both Fruit and Flowers in her growth.

113. OF J. PROTUS

As Leaves from Trees in Autumn by the wind
Are whiffled all away, none left behind;
The bald-man so, by shaking of his head
Hath shook off all those Hairs which there were bred.

114. OF THEODORUS

When David threescore years and Ten was old,
A fair young Virgin kept him from the cold:
Thou to be like that Prophet great and sage,
A young wife hast espous’d in thine old Age.

115. OF THE PLAGUE IN ENGLAND, 1603

This Plague so many men and women slew,
That scarce is place for any Plague anew.

116. TO A CERTAIN WOMAN

If Fortune had thee favour’d, as did Nature,
England had not a more accomplish’d Creature:
When Trojan Wars began hadst thou been born,
Troy for thy sake might have been sack’d and torn.

117. OF A PERJURED PERSON CONVICTED BY HIS OWN HAND-WRITING

In vain perfidious; thy words deny
That Truth which thine own hand doth testifie:
That words more constancy than Deeds should have,
One Mouth to thee, not two thy Maker gave,
But one Tongue, though two hands to thee belong;
Why single are thine Hands, double thy Tongue?

118. OF COTTULA, A GRAMMATICASTER

Thus Cottula did Labyrinth expound,
Because (quoth he) great labour in ’t is found.

119. ANAGRAM OF ROME. TO THE CARTHAGINIANS

Stout Annibal in a few hours delay’d
His fortune, having not Romes wealth survey’d:
He knew to conquer, knew not how to prize
His Conquest, though an African and wise.
Alas, what loss had he? Procrastination
Though small, preserv’d great Rome from Devastation.

120. OF A GREAT CLARK

Sick Stomachs much receive, not much concoct;
So thou know’st much, I know, yet are indoct.(Untaught

121. OF ONE CALLED DAVIS, LATELY DECEASED

From London Davisses thou bragg’st Descent,
And dost dissent from British Orient.
Ignoble thou, a noble Stock and Pure
Disclaim’st, and claim’st from Parents more obscure:
Thou with thy native soyle doth well agree,
For thou of it, and it’s asham’d of thee.

122. OF AULUS

Thee wise men thin a fool: Fools think thee wise:
What are? What think’st thou of thy self? Advise.

123. OF LINUS, A DOCTOR

Why dost for form things frame, so coveting
Wit slightest? Form gives Essence to the thing.
If thou deny this Philosophick Norme,
I vouch it; thou wert Doctor made for Form.

124. OF THAIS

O would thou were less fair, or honest more,
For no thing’s fouler than the fairest Whore.

125. OF A NAMELESS VOLUMINOUS WRITER

When dire dure Hunger, and sad wants oppresst thee,
When Thirst insatiated did molest thee,
Thy Books thou (self distracted) did distract.
What should’st thou do? Famine advis’d that Act.
Thee Poverty compell’d, thy Books (with sweat
Compil’d) first pen’d, after to vend, and eat.

126. ON A BALD PATE

Lo, not a hair thine heads bald Crown doth Crown:
Thy Faithless Front hath not one hair thine own:
Before, Behind thine hair’s blown off with Blast,
What’s left thee to be lost? Thine Head at last.

127. TO CLAUDIUS AND LINUS

Lewd Claud, to make thee good, thou want’st sole will:
Thou Linus want’s sole Power to make thee ill.

128. TO GEORGE

George, whether thou desir’st to b’ in my Book, Nom.
Wherein a Verse averse is, if thou look:
Or whether of thy Kindred I should raise Gen.
Trophys in verse, oft sounding Thine-their Praise:
Or whether I to thee would recommend Dat.
Due thanks, my Verse cannot due thanks repend: (Repay
’Tis well no Verse of mine thee doth accuse: Accus.
If this thy Name well pleaseth Me-my Muse.
If generous, O George, thou would’st be called Voc.
Thou in th’ extremest Place shall still b’ install’d.
Wo’s me, that I my Verse cannot inforce
Longer to hold with thee a long Discourse. Abl.

129. A LOVER IS A WARRIOR

Souldiers with Harlots Aulus well compar’d:
Mars bodies arm’d, Venus unarm’d doth guard.

130. THE MILITARY OATH

The Latines Sacrament, call’d sacred Oath,
Which Souldiers to their Captain did betroth:
If Sacrament be but an Oath, then there
More Sacraments than two will soon appear.

131. OF ALANUS, COVETOUS AND LAME

Give but a Gift t’ Alanus, He, though Lame,
Is hundred-handed to receive the same:
But if for Gift a Gift he must restore,
He’s Lame that hundred-handed was before.

132. THE CONDITION OF KINGS

While This forbears, That fears Truth to relate
To Kings, O miserable Kingly state!

133. VIS, IUS. FORCE, RIGHT. TO A LAWYER. TO DOMINUS WILLIAM JONES, LAWYER, HIS KINSMAN

Vis, Force; Ius, Right are adverse: yet the Name
Of Vis and Ius inverted, is the same.

134. OF MARCUS

Wives, Widows, Maids, Whores, Wenches, (women-kind)
Thou lov’st, but thine own Wife thou leavst behind:
Among so many kinds of Venus sports
Why leav’st the lawful, lov’st th’ unlawful sorts?

135. DESPERATE DEBT

Whose not in Debt t’ his wife? Who solvent* is?
None solid, but insolvent is in This.

* Solvency or Payment is not to be understood, but of one that is able to pay the whole debt. Jabol. de Verb. Signif. 1. Solvendo.

136. OF CULIANUS

Wise men are wonders:* wonders now are none:
Then now there is no wise man; no, not one.
But Culian, th’ art wise: then wonders are;
Or thou from wisdom, Culian, art far.

* Cic. de Divin. lib. 2.

136. OF MARCUS, A MAN VENUST OR COMELY

Too much of Venus usted* part of Thee,
That in some Part thou maist Venustus be.

* Burnt.

138. OF ADRIAN, A VERSIFIER

Derided Epigrams, derided Verse
Thou writest, which with mirth have no commerce:
No mirth is in them; yet the Reader smil’d,
Because both wit and mirth from them’s exil’d.

139. I, THOU, HE. TO A CERTAIN GRAMMATICASTER

There’s no man but prefers Himself unt’ All:
Hence the first Person, I, we count and call.
Thou fam’st thy present, blam’st thine absent Friend,
He Thou next Me, and He next Thee doth tend.

140. ASK AND IT SHALL BE GIVEN YOU

That which was promis’d Askers heretofore
Is given now to Givers: men no more
Will gratis give: what’s gratis comes from Heaven:
Of nought comes nought: Give, and it shall be given.

Date et dabitur vobis.

141. MARRIED PERSONS, CHILDREN, PARENTS

Husband and wife once two, are not but one:
Once one, two now are Father and his Son.

142. OF MARCUS, A LAWYER

Thou pleadest for thy self not Client; he
Not for himself, but brings his Gold for thee:
The certain Laws uncertain Causes cross:
Thou sure of gain, thy Client’s sure of loss.

143. TO HIS FATHER

As man more excellent than woman is,
I so thy son do more excel in this.

144. AN ITALIAN

Th’ Italians of their wives (as Books comprize)
The parts incluse secluse Monopolize:
This, what God said unt’ Eve, the woman gains
By this, I will multiplicate thy pains.

145. WHAT WIFE THE AUTHOR WOULD HAVE. TO HIS FRIEND DOMINUS WILLIAM BUTTON, 1606

I like a woman facile to be lov’d, (Easy
To love difficile, comely, well approv’d; (Reluctant
Rivals in love I like; deserve she should
The love of all, not love alone I would.

146. TO ONE COMPLAINING THAT HIS CHILDREN WERE NOT LIKE HIM

Would’st on thy wife beget a Self-like Child?
First get a wife like thee compos’d-compil’d.

147. TO THE MARRIED. OF CONJUGAL LOVE

When Adam had espoused Eve his Bride,
No woman was for him to love beside:
Love Conjugal is therefore First and best:
Paternal doth the Second Love attest.

148. SIR FRANCIS DRAKE’S EPITAPH

Though Papistry should rage in time to come,
It would not, Drake, I think, dig up thy Tomb:
Thou need’st not fear it should thy Body burn,
For in the water safe from Fire’s thine Urne.

149. A CHILD’S EPITAPH DYING BEFORE HIS GRANDFATHER AND FATHER

Death keeps no method, Logick’s Art denies:
A Son before his Sire and Grandsire dies.

150. EPITAPH OF MAURUS

His Soul of ’s Corps, his Corps of ’s Soul’s bereft;
Maurus wants both: his Name is only left.

151. EPITAPH OF PYRAMUS AND THISBE

Death friendly-foe from you that grief remov’d,
Which brought on Death before: because you lov’d.

152. THOMAS MOOR, DYING

Moor had his Head from’s Body severed:
But would not have his Hair cut from his Head.

153. THREE LANGUAGES CRUCIFIED

Hebrew, Greek, Latine, First, Next, Third commixt;
Sacred, Learn’d, Roman, all three Crucifixt.

154. DON ANTONIO, KING OF PORTUGAL

Between thee and thy Kingdom a Divorce
Was lately made against thy will, by force:
Now thou maist of thy Kingdom (took away)
What Christ Himself did of his Kingdom say.*

* My Kingdom is not of this world.

155. ALEXANDER, ARISTOTLE

He great’st of Kings, of Sophists tis compleater,
Great Alexander, Aristotle greater:
This learn’d, made Alexander more compleat;
Great He, made Aristotle not more great.

156. OF PLATO

The Bees which swarm’d on Plato’s lips, do still
Distill rare Sweets from his mellifluous Quill.

157. VIRGIL’S GEORGICKS

Thou, Maro, writ’st rich Verse of Husbandry,
And doth manure the Readers wit thereby.

158. PERSIUS THE POET

Dark Persius I read, but not conceive: (Understand
I’ th’ dark he doth his Readers lead and leave.

159. TACITUS

Thee Candor made Truth telling Nature wise,
Briefness obscure, and Gravity concise.

160. TO MARTIAL

Persons thou know’st to spare, to speak of things,
All thy Conceits are honyed, have no Stings.

161. TO PETRARCH

While O thy Laura’s read, the doubt will be,
Lawrel or Laura whether fitt’st for thee.

162. PLINY, ENGLISHT BY PHILEMON HOLLAND, A PHYSICIAN

Pliny writes many things, is long: is short
Much writing: scal’s longer, * shorter** for’t.

* More plene.(Copious ** More plain.

163. OF CICERO. TO CATULLUS

What thou didst tell, Catullus, and foretell
Of Cicero, was true: for it befell.

164. OF HISTORIANS IN THIS AGE. TO SIR THOMAS SACKVILLE, SON OF THE EARL OF DORSET

Historians of old wrote truth, no lyes:
Now to write lies, no truth, it doth suffice.
This Nay, that Yea concludes: O which I pray
Shall the next Age believe of Yea or Nay?
The certain Reader is uncertain, whether
He Neither of them shall believe, or Either.

165. KINGS, PEOPLE

By Kings unlearn’d the People’s led-misled,
Like faultring feet by a distemp’red Head.

166. THE SENATE

Kings Reign alone, why rule they not alone?
He ruleth best, who’s rul’d by more than one.

167. TO AN HISTORIAN. TO SIR THOMAS SACKVILLE

Thou conversant in Histories dost read,
And travelst without danger, without dread:
An History doth teach in Time, though short,
More than long Times Experience doth comport.

168. OF DIET. TO SIR JOHN HARINGTON, KNIGHT

If old thou wouldst be slowly, then use all
Med’cines, like Modicums, Reciprocal.
Like too much meat, Med’cines may health infest;
And meat like Med’cines us’d is most times best.

169. THE PEERS OF FRANCE

Not altogether Peers: for it appears
Imparity with Parity co-heres.

170. P. MAGNUS, C. MAJOR, F. MAXIMUS. POMPEY, CATO, FABIUS

This great’st, less than the great, greater than he
The Greater: which is greatest of the three?

171. TO THE MOST LEARNED SIR THOMAS SACKVILLE, SON OF THE EARL OF DORSET

Thy wit and Judgement in my Verse to show
My wit and Judgement are too weak, too low.
Thy wit and Judgement I transcendent find,
Or else my wit and Judgement both are blind:
But whatso’ere my Judgement is, or wit,
I to thy wit and Judgement mine submit.

172. OF HIMSELF. TO SAMUEL DANIEL, POET

What wonder if bad Verse my Muse unveils?
For I nor claw mine Head, nor gnaw my Nails.

173. THE FIVE SENSES

These Five to will and pleasure that relate,
Do they their Office, or officiate?

174. SEEING

The more the sight assimilates the Mind,
The more it draws it, makes it more inclin’d.

175. HEARING

How soon sounds vocal vanish from our Ear!
Like Air they come, like Air they disappear.

176. SMELLING

Between the mouth and Eyes th’ expanded Nare (Nostril
Doth carnal with spiritual things compare.

177. TASTING

That meat may be more pleasing to the Tast,
Hunger, like Sauce, will sweeten the repast.

178. TOUCHING

Some Touch sole pleaseth, some hath Titillation:
This youth, that Age affects with Delectation.

179. OBJECTS OF THE SENSES

Sight, Hearing, Smelling, tasting, Touching, thse
Affect, infect my Senses as they please.

180. TOUCHING AND TASTING

Some are, who can not Smell, nor Hear, nor See:
And of five Senses are depriv’d of three:
Why want none Tasting, Touching? ’cause of these
That th’ individ, this guards the Species.

181. EPIGRAMS, SATYRES

Satyres are but long Epigrams; And these
Are but short Satyres, to displease, or please:
Satyres avail not, if they be not tart;
Nor Epigrams, unless like Satyres, smart.

182. A DUMB MAN

He moves his lips, but utters no true sound,
Let Apollonius his mind expound.

183. BLIND AND DEAF

Why this with ’s Eyes, with’s Ears more quick is he?
This hears with’s Eyes, he with his Ears doth see.

184. TEETH AND TONGUE

Dens* comes from Edens, Eating; Lingua, Tongue,
From Licking; each from what doth t’ it belong.

* A tooth.

185. THE PHOENIX AND THE VIPER

The dying Phoenix leaves a living seed;
But living Vipers dying are to breed.

186. THE SILK-WORM

Me skill doth kill, I make my self my Tomb,
I draw my fatal Thread, spin Death my Doom.

187. THE RIGHT-HAND

To give or take I use my Right-Hand; Why?
Lest what my Right-Hand doth, my left should ’spy.

188. THE LEFT-HAND

From Pleasantness the Left-Hand hath its name;
An idle Hand, and in all Labour lame.

189. SUNDAY

Why’s the day call’d (when Light was first dilated)
Sunday, when yet the Sun was not created?

190. TERRA DI LAVORO

Why is Campania so fully fam’d
For Pleasure, now the Land of Labour named?

191. GARMENTS

New things wax old, and old things are renew’d:
Thus men are pleas’d with a vicissitude.

192. WINE

Wine from sad hearts expelleth Grief; and mine
Letificates, dilating when supine. (Grows happy

193. A SHEEP

Want we flesh, skins, young, dung, dice, Musick-strings,
Wooll, Milk? one Sheep supplies with all these things.

194. SOYLING OF FIELDS

Dung’s a vile Excrement; yet hath its worth:
Its Element mine Aliment brings forth.

195. HARMONY

Discording Concords best concur in Nature:
So man and woman generate a creature.

196. A PARRET

If words t’ invert be lawful, and unblam’d,
A Parret then a prater shall be nam’d.

197. INK AND PAPER

That it may more apparent be, we write
With cole-black Ink on Paper Snow-like white.

198. A COMEDY

The Scene our facts obscene describes-descries: (Decries
Our faults are found not feign’d in Comedies.

199. A CLOAK

My Cloak from th’ Earth, than I my self more far’s.

A GOWN

My Gown sweeps th’ Earth, my Mind transcends the Stars.

200. A SATYRE

One reason Satyres did produce and Laws:
Ill Manners of both’s being were the Cause.

201. AN EUNUCH

My Testicles I want, yet I attest
My self a Man, a Masculine at least.

202. AN HOUR-GLASS

False is the truest Hour-glass: for with use
The Sand wears smaller, wider grows the Sluce.

203. A MERCHANT

’Tis hard to say That Merchant’s rich or poor,
Who to the trustless Seas intrusts his store.

204. LUST

That thing’s deformed fair form’d by night should seem,
’Tis not black Nights, but ’tis blind Lust’s esteem.

205. DONNA, LADY

By how much more man’s Lord of ’s wife, why than
His wife, his Lady calls th’ uxorious Man?

206. A SOULDIER

Though Wars give bloody Skarrs, yet more are harm’d
By naked Venus, than by Mars when arm’d.

207. AN ARMY

Huge Hulk, Faith faithless, inhumane, too greedy
Of bloodshed, to shed humane blood too speedy.

208. LOVERS TEARS

As fervent fire from wood the moisture drills,
So Love within the Tears from th’ Eyes distills.

209. THE STARS

He that affects th’ odd Number (that is, God)
Created all the Stars, in number odd.

210. THE VENETIANS

As Seas with Waters, Skyes with Stars abound:
So Riches the Venetians surround.

211. AN HARP

Sith th’ Harps discording Strings concording be, (Since
Is’t not a shame for men to disagree?

212. A FOWLER

Shun cruel Flames, not knowing sports event.
All Elements give thy sport Aliments.

213. THE ECHO

No skill nor Art a voice can form, or sound:
Sole Echo doth reiterate the sound.

214. A LOOKING-GLASS

Than Phidias or Apelles wiser, thou
The Bodies motion form’st, they knew not how.

215. THE ECHO, AND LOOKING-GLASS

Nothing of Life hath th’ Echo, but to squeake:
The Glass would seem to live, if it could speak.

216. MUSICK. TO HIS FRIEND WILLIAM JAMES

The name of Musick from the Muses came;
Best Art; none other Science hath this Name.

217. TO SIR HENRY FANSHAW, KNIGHT, A MECAENAS OF THE MUSES

I have given you three books, you have given me three pounds. So far, nobody has bought my work at a higher price.

218. ALBION. TO THE KING

England was once an Heptarchy: that while
Into nine Parts was parted all this Isle.
Unhappy Britain when divided thus;
United, happy made by thee for us.

Go to Book III