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1. blue

spacerWhy vainly construct ramparts in the middle of fields, why use stone to fashion walls meant never to crumble? The Pictish Wall of yours, built with such effort, has disappeared, and its huge mass is gone. Your enemy has departed, all fear is gone, a single man has joined us with a single bond, for us there now remains a single welfare. So let the wall fall, let the highway lie open, let the mass tumble., since we are under the rule of a single man, without dispute. Let lords and commons join in prayer because of that single man’s peace, in whom resides peace for the commons and peace for the lords.

ROBERT BURTON B. A., OF CHRIST CHURCH

spacer2. blue

ON THE SUN, VENUS AND MERCURY, IN CONJUNCTION IN VIRGO AT THE TIME THE KING WAS ABOUT TO ENTER CHRIST CHURCH

spacerVenus is joined to the sun, the Lord of Cyllene blue to Venus, in a single part of Virgo — what am I to make of this? The sun is the King, Venus is the Queen, Virgo is the Church, and Mercury the Prince of Wales — what could be clearer? Thus, oh thus, you stars of heaven, always harbingers of the truth, signify that these gods are designed to come. And whenever the sun and the grandson of Atlas and Pleione blue are conjoined with Venus in Virgo, may your presence honor us, and thus often visit your Christ Church, blue great James. Meanwhile, your presence is thrice-welcome, thrice-great prince, and no guest more welcome could come. This loyal House humbly bid you greetings, its walls ring out bienvenu.

ROBERT BURTON M. A.

3. blue

THE MALIGN ASPECT OF THE STARS OBTAINING AT 8:00 P. M. ON NOVEMBER 6, 1612, AT WHICH TIME DIED PRINCE HENRY

spacerAt the hour when the illustrious prince bade farewell to this world, why were five of the seven planets hidden? The two that remained in the upper aether were baleful. Why was Saturn driving nearly to heaven’s pinnacle? Why did Mars, that exiled wanderer, a star which inspires horrible wars on earth. possessed the sky by itself? And why had the sun abandoned the world? Why has gentle Jupiter has sunk down deep, why is the wandering moon concealed? Swift-moving Mercury and that wholesome star of Venus, why have they hastily quit the sky? Should I call this an accident, or should I imagine these beneficial stars have chosen to absent themselves from heaven, and that that they were lingering in the Western Sea so as not to witness so dire a portent? For, had Death not glimpsed this opportunity, would it have dared hurled its darts at Henry’s beloved person? It would have dared nothing of the kind, had not this opportunity empowered it, when the heaven could be of no help to the earth. Thus it was, oh you gods. Thus, thus you chose for this grievous time, his lamentable hour, to be at hand. The sun had promised him the crown and long years, happy Jupiter everlasting rule, sweet Venus a bride and many children, Diana rule over the sea, and the son of Maia eloquence. But, being unable to furnish these things, perhaps they were kept away by their sense of shame, or their grief made them stay away. And yet they are providing these things as best they can at heaven’s apex, since the Fates deny them their wish. Phoebus grants him an eternal home on star-studded Olympus, and Jupiter says his glory will be immortal. Mercury promises him fame, and whatever can be furnished by the Muses and his mercurial wit. Venus bestows a tomb and sweet scents, hymns, and all that pertains to a noble burial. Diana gives him a garland woven of manifold gems, an vial full of tears, and a bier.

ROBERT BURTON M. A., OF CHRIST CHURCH

4. blue

spacerThose who just now were in mourning with cypress blue shading their locks are now making happy sounds once more, their temples bound with myrtle. And the day which brought us torches and funeral wreaths has now changed into a day which will bring the joys of the marriage-bed. Noble Frederick is marrying beloved Eliza. blue Oh be favorable, Hymen, mother Venus, and Juno Patroness of Marriage. blue

spacerShe is the right famous nymph of the Calydonian woods, our star of the north, the Cynosure of the British race. He is the glory and single praise of the Hircynian Forest, blue the bright shining light of the Germans, who surpasses them all. She has the scent of roses, he the fragrance of cinnamon. Oh be favorable, Hymen, mother Venus, and Juno Patroness of Marriage.

spacerHe is a glory of the Muses, and she of the Graces, and both are illustrious for the endowments of nature and fortune. They are equal in religion, years, and ardors. So come, grow together into a single Geryon-like blue body, albeit a single mind lives in distinct bodies. Oh be favorable, Hymen, mother Venus, and Juno Patroness of Marriage.

spacerSuch as Paetus was beloved to his wife, and Arria to Paetus, blue such as the daughter of Tyndaraeus was to that Trojan boy, and Adonis was to Venus, so is Eliza to you, and Frederick to Eliza. May yours be the harmony of turtledoves, the long years of crows, blue and a shared grace of the marriage-bed. Oh be favorable, Hymen, mother Venus, and Juno Patroness of Marriage.

spacerAs plant begets plant, and seed produces seed, as eagles breed eagles, so let a line of kings be born of their stock, as their heavenly image, which may illuminate all Europe, rule the climes of the Northern region and widely govern throughout the world. Oh be favorable, Hymen, mother Venus, and Juno Patroness of Marriage.

spacerAs long as the Neckar spills its chill waters into the Rhine and the Thames roils bright sands in its estuary, let a little Frederick be playing in your imperial court. Let Heidelberg see and dread your descendants. We pray the gods bring this to pass, let all our pious entreaties be heard. Oh be favorable, Hymen, mother Venus, and Juno Patroness of Marriage.

ROBERT BURTON M. A., OF CHRIST CHURCH

5. blue

ON THE BODLEIAN LIBRARY

spacerLet Memphis keep still about its barbaric wonders of the Pyramids, or proud Rome about whatever it has contributed. Justinian, let your Byzantine shores cease boasting far and wide about their temple of Wisdom. blue Let Venice and Trondheim stop showing off their cathedrals, blue and the Escorial its palace. Let Strassburg and Cremona hold their tongue about their towers, and Seville keep its Moorish brickwork concealed. Let each of these structures defer to our Library, let Fame speak of this single work rather than all of the rest.

6.

TO BODLEY

spacerHere, where once prevailed sad Chaos, deep murk, moths, bookworms, and barbarism, where once the spider dangled from its thread, and it was foul to behold, and nothing existed but squalor, now there shines the gilded wooden beam and painted ceiling, and a noble library gleams with new light. A variety of books stand in their fair order, each Muse being classified according to her own divisions. Under Bodley’s patronage, the Muse is returned to herself, and they become as beloved to the people, as they had been to their individual owners.

7.

TO THE SAME

spacerWhat people is so far-distant, what people employs such a barbarous language that the Library possesses none of its books? Whatever the Indian, the Arab, the Greeks have written, the Romans, the Ethiopians, whatever the Persian Muse has contributed, or whatever the tongue of the Hebrew, the Syrian once contributed in days of old, or the Frenchman, the Italian, or the Spaniard — all of these Bodleian has massed in a single cCollection, so that, as if with a single mouth, they hymn you as their Maecenas. And these walls will resound with your name forever, since they have been reborn at your expense. The sweet odor of your fame will pass throughout the world, and the Muse cannot be forgetful of her high priest.

ROBERT BURTON M. A., OF CHRIST CHURCH

8. blue

ON THE SCOTS AND THE ENGLISH, NEXT-DOOR NEIGHBORS SEPARATED BY THE PICTISH WALL, AS IF IT WERE AN EQUATOR, WITH JAMES BEING THE SUN SIMULTANEOUSLY ILLUMINATING THE MID-DAY SUN OF BOTH PEOPLES, AND PRODUCING VARIOUS EFFECTS ON THIS SIDE OF THE WALL AND ON THAT

spacerThese nations facing each other are next-door neighbors, and an Equator separates them, setting them into two parts. The same sun hangs over them, at the same time shining on them both and, being in the middle, illuminating them both. Hence they have a single day, a single night, and at opposite times they are both visited by summer and winter. We are next-door neighbors, who would deny it? Each of these opposing nations has its own laws and its peculiar government. And a wall separates us, like an Equator, albeit the influence of a single man supports us both: King James who, like the golden sun, governs us both by his star-like, constant light. From afar he beholds the territories of Caithness and Rhutupina blue and shines on them both at once. The Britons of the south and whatever lies between them and the North Pole are bathed by your beams, you noble Phoebus. Both nations have the same day while James presides, and when your sun sets they will share the same night. Yet although we both have have a single day and a single night, there are alternating shifts in our affairs and our British weather, which you create, Phoebus, with your oblique rays. I speak from experience: when your erstwhile brightness and serene countenance deserted us, at the same time we were deserted by summertime and fair weather, and whatever else the flowery part of the year possesses. We were overcome by cloud, darkness and steady rain, and for us in our dejection the air was gloomier, while in the meantime, Caesar, those on whom you condescended to bestow your presence, how many holidays they observed, what pleasant banquets, games, spectacles, triumphs, rejoicing as you shone upon their faces! But now, when Phoebus inclines to our regions, the zephyr blows, and it grows more pleasantly warm. Autumn blue becomes springtime, clouds are banished from the heaven, now the sky rejoices and the air shines. See how our downcast spirits and wounded hearts are revived at the first sight of yourself. When, your majesty, we see you come back safe and sound, with what a happy roar each man greets you! They vie with gifts (these with grape-vines, those with verses), and lords and dutiful commons rush forward. On the other hand, for those whose your presence has abandoned, from whom you have withdrawn your sunbeams, come devastation, sloth, and the rigors of winter, and they mourn your departure, since their happy days have left them. Oh, long may you remain with us and fend off the winter-time, bringing constant light and laughter! I pray that, just as happy England now flourishes thanks to your sunbeams, it will forever flourish in the sunshine. When the sun goes forth from his bedchamber like a bridegroom, blue rejoicing in his course, or as an indomitable giant, happily go forth from your throne and complete your God-designed and God-appointed course.

ROBERT BURTON, BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY, FROM CHRIST CHURCH

9. blue

ON THE DEATH OF THE RIGHT SERENE ANNE, QUEEN OF THE ENGLISH, MARCH 15, 1619

spacerLampido, blue the Spartan woman most famous in her time, was a unique woman among the female sex, and the happiest among the happy. For she was the consort, daughter, and mother of kings. Anne, that star of the British, that daughter of Juno, descended from the gods, was likewise a king’s daughter, wife, and mother. Both of these divine women were mothers of kings and their divine offspring. But you ask which was the greatest, she or the other? “As much as cypress trees are taller than the little viburnums below them,” blue thus much Anne raised her head above this Spartan woman. As much as Laconia defers to the English nation, so much does that Pelasgian blue girl defer to Anne, our goddess. So much does she defer in her offspring, surpassed in her consort, in her offspring, her fortune, beauty, and pedigree. So Pliny ought to award the palm to Anne, for Anne excels all others in her beauty and her endowments of character. Anne is the ornament of her nation, the glory of brides, the darling among mothers, and the only little jewel of her sex. But she has died, alas, she has died, and neither her prosperity nor her beauty’s grace could preserve her when savage death arrived. She has perished, and behold, she who found no equal in life is the equal of any woman you care to name in death: thus commands the urn, she is fallen. She has perished, and again Astraea blue has quit the earth. This Astraea shines as the bright star of the British, not like that Astraea that glows in the Zodiac, not where Callisto and Cassiopia shine, she has not been awarded that place where Bootes follows his plough (slow to set, and endlessly circling), no eagle or Iris, daughter of Thaumas, no swift Mercury has set her in the sky. Rather a prophetic comet showed her the way and, mounting above the aether, said, “Follow this way and I shall provide light, beloved companion.” She followed it above the skies and, leaving the stars behind her, victoriously joins the gods as Anna Perenna. blue She comes as Anna Perenna, why should she not thus be named Anna? Anna is a goddess, and more truthfully has this for a name? Dido’s sister, blue the same who has presided over the years, was drowned in the river Numicius. She was held to be a goddess and once named this, while the conscious stream detained its silent course. She seemed herself to say, ”I am the water nymph of the calm Numicius. Concealed in the constant flow, I am named Anna Perenna.” blue Henceforth the birthday of Anna Perenna was celebrated on the Ides of March, when the common folk were nothing if not drunken. And this Anne, sister to the King of Denmark, died on the Kalends of March, yet died to a better destiny. As long as the British Empire endures, as long as poetry endures, Anna Perenna will live and thrive on the lips of bards. And as long as the English name endures in this month of March, there will be an Englishman to perform your sacred rites.

ROBERT BURTON, BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY, FROM CHRIST CHURCH

10. blue

spacerAs often as I gaze up at the heaven, variable with its constellations, the oblique Zodiac, and the starry heaven, I see fierce monsters here, and animals there: fish, dogs, hares, illusory images of men, shaggy bears, chariots, wains, dragons, humble beasts of the field, and the Gorgon’s face shine. Why is Aries in the sky, why Taurus with its huge shape, why brute Cancer? What is Capricorn doing? By what right? Could the imperious power of bards have dared such a crime? Do you tolerate this, Ptolemy? Let this criminal brood be pulled down and cast into the Pit. Let them quickly suffer that which they deserve. Perseus, Hercules, Cepheus, divine Orion, Chiron and the Twins, and fair Antinous, blue who the ancients (noble astronomers in their day) once deemed worthy of their homes, may stay, and deservedly so. But why are you in the sky, you slut? blue Why are a lyre, a swan, a lion, a vulture, and wild beasts in the sky? Let this rambling crew come down, but the divine scions of heroes, a group worthy of Jove, have their places: Alfonso, Bacon, blue Tycho, Copernicus (that second Atlas), Cavendish, and American Drake, men who in their day kept company with the sun and who employed its beams to study its contents and the wandering constellations of the sky, and deservedly took possession of heaven. And you, oh divine Savile, take a star, and, being worthy of that star, take your place in heaven. Oh, if some bard would flourish in our age who could make this decision! If there were some Apollo who could grant you that space, as Ovid once promoted the dying Caesar’s shade to the aether. blue And yet there is no need for an Ovid or an Apollo, for the Muse will grant you an everlasting name. Your glory is immortal: as long as the moon roams the sky, Savile’s fame will be immortal.

ROBERT BURTON, BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY, FROM CHRIST CHURCH

11. blue

spacerThat Prince Charles departed in disguise, and that he swiftly went and returned over the sea and across mountains, should be no cause for your wonder: Love commanded him. For the sake of that god, Jupiter once was transformed into a bull, a horse, rain, and a swan.

ROBERT BURTON, BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY, FROM CHRIST CHURCH

12. blue

spacerIf I could fashion statues out of Parian marble, if I could paint men with lively color, if I could paint faces and reproduce them in lifelike color, if I could engrave their images in brass or bless the deserving in the stars of heaven, my statues, color, brass, and marble would depict Camden. blue Camden once such things in praise of Ascham, and thus I sing your praises, Clarencieux, blue from your lips, in the same words and verses you used to celebrate him. You are far more deserving of being honored with Parian marble, of being hymned by a painter, the Muses, and any poet you care to mind, worthier to be gifted by the stars with a home in heaven, of being adored by Apollo’s priest with perpetual honors.

ROBERT BURTON, BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY, FROM CHRIST CHURCH

13. blue

ON KING JAMES’ TOMB

spacer“Who lies here?” King James. “What throng sadly clusters around your tomb, divine James?” Peace, the Muses, the Graces, and Mercy? “And who is that old man?” The presiding genius of Europe. “And this woman?” A British nymph. They are all in mourning. “What’s the reason for this grieving?” Our honor, our mainstay and darling has perished. So adieu at length, fostering peace. Mourn, you Muses, James is dead, to your destruction. And let the British grieve forever. Now, with peace lost, seek your ruin, you citizens of Europe.

ROBERT BURTON, BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY, FROM CHRIST CHURCH

14. blue

spacerThose whom great cliffs and the roaring ocean had divided are joined in love’s sweet league. You, our British Leander, safely possess a fair French Hero on the English shore, and the deep seas fall silent. “If such waters had once been yours, Leander, those straits, horribly resounding, would not be guilty of your death.” blue

ROBERT BURTON, BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY, FROM CHRIST CHURCH

15. blue

spacerWhat is the meaning of such great rumor and happy whispering? Why is every street bright with a new bonfire? An infant Augustus is born. But every year has boast thus, every region you care to name possesses its king. And yet a king is not born every day: born to you, Englishman, is a golden child, an august prince. A scion of Juno blue is born to you alone, Englishman, and a new star shines in your sky. Therefore, Britain, you should rejoice in this happy birth, and I pray this star shines in your sky forever. Let countless joys be accumulated over countess centuries. Let them grow apace, Florida, blue thanks to your delights.

ROBERT BURTON, BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY, FROM CHRIST CHURCH

16. blue

spacerJust as the sun passes through the Zodiac in equal months and twice crosses the equator in its circuit, wandering from the Tropic of Cancer to the Tropic of Capricorn, bathing both zones with its brilliance, thus, noble king, you traverse your our nation, in your divinity visiting both your realms. Imagine that the Pictish Wall is the equator and England Cancer, and let Scotland represent your region, Capricorn. And since the sun lingers longer in Cancer, let the home of your government be more firmly-founded for the English.

ROBERT BURTON, BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY, FROM CHRIST CHURCH

17. blue

spacerThe entire world has lately been exclaiming on how various this life is, your Swedish majesty, in speaking of your sad fate and demise. blue From it has arisen grim war and the most savage sight of death. How many heroes, how many commanders have perished! Behold, among all this grieving, new and most welcome developments have befallen us: a royal boy is born in our world. Pour wine to his guardian genius. Cease, you old complains, let nothing but sweet music resound in this land.

18. blue

spacerLive long, happy girl, born of our British Jove, you who are a king’s daughter will be the consort of a king and the mother of kings, the aunt of kings, the ancestress of kings. You will breed a thousand kingly pedigrees which will surpass Constantine and British Helen, blue and will bestow royal scepters on the world.

ROBERT BURTON, BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY

19. blue

spacerI lack any silver, I have no stock of gold, but I cheerfully give you what I have, divine girl. Let Juno grant you a crown, the goddess of Cyprus beauty, blue Pallas wisdom, and Mercury words. Thus I pray, and when you come to the age to marry, I hope you find a worthy husband, royal girl.

ROBERT BURTON, BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY

20. blue

THE SAME ENGLISHED

Can nurse choose in her sweet babe more to find
Then goods of fortune, body, and of mind?
Loe here at once all this: what greater blisse
Canst hope or wish? Heaven. Why there he is.

ROB. BURTON OF CH. CH.

Finis